Storyvalues Featured by MaRS Discovery District


Storyvalues, Inc., is pleased to announce that we have been selected by MaRS Discovery District in Toronto as an educational innovator to watch.

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The online article features a short interview with Storyvalues owners Cheryl Thornton and Matthew Giffin, wherein they discuss the important role of storytelling in education and marketing. Here is a brief excerpt:

Storyvalues has a magic secret: storytelling.

Every year we perform for thousands of children and adults throughout Ontario, where we see time and again how a well-told story captures the imagination and inspires the intellect.

At these events, we distribute passports to children to take home to their parents, inviting them to listen to and explore the stories on the Storyvalues website.

The resulting interaction is deeply meaningful, encompassing factual information as well as rich creativity.

This kind of profound engagement, achieved through storytelling, is the cornerstone of successful marketing as well as the foundation of education itself.

Storyvalues, Inc., wishes to extend sincere thanks to MaRS Discovery District in Toronto and to Joe Wilson in particular, whose guidance and support have been invaluable.

Link to full article here:

http://marscommons.marsdd.com/business-models-matter/storyvalues/

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Real Life Words, Like Feathers


There is a fantastic Jewish folktale, originating from Poland, called ‘Words Like Feathers’. It tells the tale of three extremely talkative women who inaccurately identify a boy as a thief. In no time at all, word spreads until the entire village thinks of the innocent boy as a criminal. It takes the village Rabbi to show the women that words can cause widespread damage, impossible to undo.

As an example, he instructs the women to empty the feathers from a pillow. As the wind takes the feathers in every direction, he instructs them to find each one and put it back.

An impossible task, just as it is impossible to ‘un-speak’ damaging words once they’ve been spoken and accepted as true.

This story has a poignant lesson about the power of words and the importance of using words consciously, with care and accuracy.

We added this story to Storyvalues to support bullying prevention initiatives in schools. It is a very popular story. Personally, I think the attention being placed on the problem of bullying at school is long overdue. The idea that bullying is somehow acceptable is finally giving way to a burgeoning consciousness of the long-term negative effects of cruel, destructive behavior.

The question I have is, how can we expect to change bullying behavior at school if that very same behavior seems is acceptable within adult society?

In the past few months alone we’ve seen many instances in the media wherein divisive and inflammatory words have been consciously used by radio and TV talk show hosts, religious leaders and politicians. These highly publicized outbursts invariably involve labeling and targeting certain segments of society: “black”, “white”, “gay”, “liberal”, etc., detailing exactly what it is that sets these groups apart from what otherwise would be “acceptable”.

Is this not a form of bullying? Or does this fall under the vast heading, “freedom of speech”? Is it somehow different when a prominent talk radio host calls an individual a “slut” than when a grade 7 student does the same?

Political and corporate leaders regularly speak ‘half-truths’ about ideological opponents, knowing that the comments will gain a foothold in the public consciousness once they are broadcast or appear in print. How is this different than a school bully spreading a rumour about another student through social media?

One might say that, like bullying in school, this type of thing has ‘always been a part’ of the social landscape, as if that would make the practice somehow ‘acceptable’.

What is different is that now our messages are broadcast much more efficiently. The ‘feathers’ now enter an extremely efficient and powerful windstorm , traveling much farther and wider than ever before through multiple forms of media, creating an echo chamber that magnifies the message and engulfs anyone who is in the range of a TV, radio or computer.

That’s pretty much everyone at this point, including kids, whom we claim we’d like to protect from this kind of behavior.

What are they learning from all of this?

– Matthew Giffin

Storytelling Apprentices


For the past several months, I’ve been working with a group of twenty storytelling apprentices at Shaughnessy Public School.  The students, age 6 to 13, have been shadowing me as I tell multicultural stories to all the grade levels in the school. During our sessions we explore and discover the elements of storytelling; setting the tone, expression and body language. 

The goal of the project is to inspire, encourage and empower these young learners to realize their potential by becoming masters of verbal and physical communication. Storytelling is perhaps the ideal approach to this kind of creative literacy.

So far, the apprentices and I have told over 30 myths and folk tales. We use musical instruments, props and costumes as we interact and dramatically interpret each story. Media literacy also plays a role; most of the stories we tell during the story sessions are  available on my online program, Storyvalues Interactive.  The students make full use of the program, spending time in the computer lab listening to the stories and learning about  each story’s culture of origin by exploring the interactive story pages.

In our live storytelling sessions, we instruct the students to focus on a specific aspect of storytelling, such as how voice is used to portray character, set the mood and support a narrative.  Sitting in rows with notebooks and pencils in hand, they look like journalist at a press conference, jotting down (or in many cases, drawing pictures of) their observations.

Proof that they are completely absorbing the information is provided by looking through their notebooks and by observing their enthusiastic participation in the performances. For many of the students, the program has provided a way to build self-awareness and confidence in how they express themselves.

This brilliant project was initiated by an amazingly talented teacher/librarian named Barb Cook.  Barb and I have worked together many times over the past ten years. She has always impressed me with her dedication to her students and creative approach to literacy.  The walls of her library overflow with student artwork; a testament to her ability to spark the interest of her students to help them learn comprehensively and passionately.

Next month, we will celebrate our wonderful storytelling apprentices in a school assembly wherein they will be using their newly developed gifts as storytellers and self-confident communicators.

I can’t wait to post the results. Stay tuned!

– Cheryl Thornton

Welcome to the Storyvalues Blog


It is increasingly rare, in this image saturated, test-score obsessed era, for children to have the opportunity to follow their instincts and arrive at their own creative conclusions.

Yet that is precisely what is needed to empower and enable them to rise to their full creative potential, so that they may thrive as adults in what will certainly be an era of greater creative expectation and possibility.

In a fundamental way, the ability to be creative, to imaginatively interact with the world in which we live, establishes how we see ourselves and our role in working and living with others.

Using Storyvalues, students, parents and educators can  experience stories, images and sounds from around the world and interact with ideas that inspire expression of personal and cooperative creativity.

  • See and play samples of the diverse musical instruments featured in the recordings.
  • Become aware of how music, words and voice can join to create a unified expression.
  • Take part in story-based follow up activities that increase comprehension and listening skills.
  • Gain insight into how people of every culture share the traditions of music and storytelling.