Stories Inspire Stoires


For years now, I’ve witnessed the amazing way in which stories inspire stories.  When I tell stories to children, they often respond by telling me stories in return, and in most cases they tell true stories from their lives.

This week after telling the story, Stone Soup, a 6 year old boy told me that he had gone to a steak house with his grandparents.  After I told the Chinese version of Little Red Riding Hood, a 7 year old girl told me that her dad heard wolves howling outside their house in the middle of the night.  Today, after telling the story of Hanukkah, a 5 year old boy told me that I had made a mistake and that he knew the right way to tell the story and began telling it to the whole school.  Unfortunately, I had to ask him to wait to finish his story until I finished the assembly and then we would talk, which we did.

Tomorrow, I get to tell stories with a sign language interpreter and can’t wait to hear the stories the students share with me.

Happy Storytelling!

Cheryl Thornton

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Scary Stories


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Yesterday was Halloween and I told ‘scary’ stories’ to my Thursday group of 5 and 6 year olds.

After telling the Chinese folktale, The Brave Girl and the Monster Snake, a little boy told me he had a video showing a capybara being eaten by a python and thought it was too bad the capybara hadn’t  heard this story about how to survive a monster snake attack!

Happy Storytelling!  

Cheryl Thornton

Encore for Aesop and Hercules


Halios_geronEach Tuesday I tell stories to a class of 2 and 3 year olds.  We had our first class this week and as always, I was amazed to see the powerful effect myths and stories have on young listeners.

When I stepped into the classroom on Tuesday morning, one little boy was crying for his mommy.  Having seen this sort of thing many times before,  I knew it was best to get started right away, before they all started crying.  I began telling the fable of the Lion and the Mouse.  After establishing the jungle scene, the weeper stopped crying and started listening.

When I finished the fable, a bright-eyed little 3-year-old girl said, “Do that again!  Start from the beginning!”  She wasn’t sure what is was that I had done, but she wanted more.

Next, I told the first labour of Hercules, and the little boy who’d been crying, shouted, “More,” with gusto!

By the end of the 30 minute period, they were all sitting silently, fully engaged in listening to stories from long ago and far away, like old hands.

Happy Storytelling!

Cheryl Thornton

‘The Hero’s Journey’… Through Elementary School, Part 1.


“The big question is whether you are going to be able to say a hearty yes to your adventure.”  – Joseph Campbell

Joseph Campbell identified the stages of ‘The Hero’s Journey’, as found in archetypal stories from around the world, to equate to those found in our own personal lives.

He stated that the transformations of childhood, adolescence, adulthood, middle age, old age and even death all hold the potential for us to awaken to our greatest, most ‘heroic’ selves.

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We live next door to an eight year old boy named Kayden. Whenever we see him playing outside he is wearing either a cape or a sword. I don’t think I’ve ever seen Kayden just ‘be Kayden’. He’s a fireman, a train engineer, a police officer, Batman, Superman, Robin Hood, Harry Potter, King Arthur, a mail carrier, a ship’s captain, an airline pilot…

To Kayden, every day is a hero’s journey. He is busy internalizing the heroic storyline through his own creative interactions with life. With the support of his patient and insightful parents, he’s setting the tone for his own journey.

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By all accounts, it will be heroic…

Like most kids, Kayden spends most of the day in school, acquiring the necessary information needed to matriculate through an educational system that is less about ‘heroism’ and more about facts, standardized testing and working within a shrinking budget.

Is this any place for a superhero?

– Matthew Giffin